Lyme Disease: The Next Pandemic?


Lyme Disease: The Next Pandemic?




http://www.wftv.com/videos/news/lyme-disease-the-next-pandemic/vCJ66/

Despite 20 bull's-eye rashes, his doc insisted it couldn't possibly be Lyme disease.


Despite 20 bull's-eye rashes, his doc insisted it couldn't possibly be Lyme disease.


http://www.pennlive.com/bodyandmind/index.ssf/2013/01/when_lyme_disease_symptoms_sti.html


When Lyme disease symptoms stick around

Body and Mind staffBy Body and Mind staff 
on January 30, 2013 at 12:38 AM, updated January 30, 2013 at 12:39 AM
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View full sizeEric Huck 
Eric Huck knew that he had been bitten by two ticks in the spring of 2009. What he never imagined then was how long and how hard he would be fighting against the Lyme disease they left behind.
“I had been hiking on the Appalachian Trail, near Fuller and Laurel lakes. Two days later, I realized I had a tick embedded in my knee and in my groin. They were engorged,” said Huck, an avid hiker and bicyclist who lives in Fairview Twp.
Huck enlisted the aid of a neighbor to remove the ticks and went to his family doctor, who prescribed 10 days of doxycycline, the standard antibiotic for Lyme disease, as a preventive measure.
Huck thought that was the end of it — until mid-August of that year when he became suddenly and severely sick.
“I had a high fever, an excruciating headache; my neck was stiff and I sweated through the sheets. My body ached so that it felt like someone had taken a baseball bat to my legs,” he said.
Several days later, 20 bull’s-eye rashes — a hallmark symptom of Lyme disease — broke out over Huck’s body. He went back to his family doctor, who insisted it could not be Lyme disease because of the doxycycline Huck had taken. Instead, he diagnosed it as rosacea and sent Huck home with medication for that skin condition.
Over the next week, Huck got sicker and sicker.
He went to see an infectious disease doctor, who immediately diagnosed Lyme disease and put him on 30 days of doxycycline. Finally, his persistent fever and headaches began to ease, but the effect was temporary and Huck said he began feeling ill again.
He went back to his doctors but, he said, “I didn’t really feel like they were listening to me.”
At the height of his disease, he had joint pain in his elbows, shoulders and knees. He had such fatigue that even walking was sometimes a challenge.
“It affected my ability to concentrate. Some days I could only manage a half day of work,” recalled Huck, who owns an investment firm in Mechanicsburg.
Looking back, Huck said he now knows he was dealing with persistent Lyme disease — also called post Lyme disease treatment syndrome.
“I began researching this and reading that the Lyme bacteria — Borrelia burgdorferi — can hide, change shapes, go dormant and create a biofilm to encase itself in order to survive in the body,” he said. “It’s the great imitator. It’s misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s, autism, arthritis, Parkinson’s, chronic fatigue, MS.”
The existence of persistent Lyme — and whether it should be treated with long-term antibiotics — has been a source of controversy. Patients who say they have it and their “Lyme literate” medical doctors are at odds with those who set protocol for treatment of Lyme disease, such as the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
A review panel convened in 2010 to examine 2006 IDSA guidelines for treatment of Lyme found that “there is no convincing evidence for the existence of chronic Lyme infection and that long-term antibiotic treatment of chronic Lyme disease is unproven and unwarranted.”
The International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, a medical society focused on accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment for Lyme, says the IDSA failed to take into account peer-reviewed, published evidence confirming persistent Lyme disease.
Dr. John Goldman, infectious disease specialist with PinnacleHealth System in Harrisburg, said he sees about 10 patients a month who have lingering symptoms of Lyme disease.
“It’s clearly a real syndrome, but it’s more an effect of having had an infection rather than having an active infection,” he said. “They are frustrated with being sick, with having a chronic illness. Most often, they are tired, achy; they don’t have the energy they used to have; rarely they report a ‘brain fog,’” he said.
Goldman said he looks for signs of another disease such as lupus, and if not, he treats patients much like he treats fibromyalgia — with anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants and amitriptyline to help them sleep. He also encourages gradual return to exercise and complementary therapies such as massage, acupuncture and yoga, if they help.
“I typically see people very slowly getting better over time,” Goldman said.
Huck said people with persistent Lyme often feel like outcasts. “The medical community doesn’t understand us; the insurance companies won’t pay for treatment and it’s hard to explain to our family and friends,” he said.
Gail Sheffer, board member of the York Lyme Disease Support Group, said Huck’s experience is common. “I’ve met people all over the state who go years trying to find out what’s wrong with them. A lot of people are misdiagnosed,” she said.
Sheffer, a Wellsville resident, said she went five months before getting a correct diagnosis in 2003. She got better but relapsed four years later, after a bout with the common cold. She has been on antibiotics since then.
“On my best days, I’m 80 percent of what I used to be. On my very worst days, I have excruciating headaches and I’ll be on the couch,” Sheffer said. “I’m fully convinced long-term antibiotics work. I don’t want to think about how bad I’d be without them.”
Finally, after connecting with other Lyme disease sufferers in the area, Huck found Dr. Norton Fishman in Rockville, Md., who describes himself as a “Lyme literate” integrative medicine doctor. He’s been a primary care internal medicine doctor for 45 years, but now devotes 80 percent of his practice to Lyme disease, he said. Many of his patients are from the midstate.
“I was treating patients for chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia when what they really had was a continuing infectious process called Lyme disease,” said Fishman, who became convinced that persistent Lyme disease existed and could be helped by long-term antibiotics, along with nutritional remedies, after many of his patients sought and found relief from a Lyme literate doctor in New York.
“The problem is that most people say, ‘you’re post infection.’ No, this is a continuing infection that’s indolent. There have been many studies that show these organisms are persistent in spite of medication,” said Fishman, who likens his care of Lyme patients to “detective work” because each person’s genetic makeup, exposure to multiple bacteria and response to treatment is different.
Fishman, who said he stopped participating with insurance carriers because his office visits required more than the 15-minute slots allotted for reimbursement, said most doctors don’t test adequately for all the bacteria that could come with a tick bite and they don’t realize that antibiotics other than doxycycline must be prescribed to treat the other infections delivered by the tick.
Huck tested positive for co-infectors and began taking other long-term antibiotics, herbal supplements and natural antibacterial and antiviral remedies.
“I have slowly been getting better for the past three years,” he said, attributing at least some of that to long-term antibiotics.
The Infectious Diseases Society of America, however, warns that inappropriate use of antibiotics, especially when given intravenously, has been shown to lead to deadly blood infections and serious drug reactions.
Goldman agrees, “You certainly don’t deny that people are suffering or that Lyme disease is affecting their life in a great way, but what we can say is that giving prolonged courses of antibiotics doesn’t help and could be dangerous.”
However, Fishman said, “The long-term use of statins and cardiac medications have side effects too. You have to measure whether the effects of the disease merit the treatment. I keep doing this because I see people who are sick, sometimes for years, are getting better.”
Fishman also prescribes lifestyle and nutrition changes for patients with persistent Lyme disease. “Find out if you are allergic to some foods you are eating and how to eat to support the immune system,” he said.
Recently, Huck traveled to Germany to receive a month of photon light therapy, which is not approved in the U.S. “It uses a quantum mechanics principle to put light photons into the body to boost immunity,” he said. The therapy, which is standard treatment for Lyme disease in Germany, is said to detoxify the body of bacteria and viruses and promote repair of damaged cells.
“I’m about as plain vanilla of a person as you can get. I’m very research and evidence based,” said Huck, explaining that swerving away from conventional medicine protocol is not normally in his nature. “But when your health gets away from you and you keep hitting walls, you’ll do something crazy for a better quality of life.”
So far, Huck feels the best he’s felt since being bitten. “I’m even thinking of trying to ride a stationary bike. I am light years better than I was, but I am not symptom-free,” said Huck, who estimates he has spent $75,000 out of pocket on Lyme disease treatment. “I’m a little nervous to say this, but I’m praying I’ve turned a corner. This disease has altered my life so much.”
WRITTEN BY CAROLYN KIMMEL, For The Patriot-News

Lyme disease :beware of babesiosis


http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/hunting/2013/01/beware-babesiosis-new-tickborne-disease-threat-outdoorsmen


January 30, 2013
Beware Babesiosis: New Tickborne Disease a Threat to Outdoorsmen - 0
Perhaps it happened on a late-spring turkey hunt. Or an early spin through grouse cover. However or whenever it got there, there it is, a tick attached to your skin—most likely just above the ankle where you forgot to tuck your pants inside your socks. A small problem easily solved with a pair of tweezers, right? Usually, but…
For decades, hunters in New England, the upper Midwest, and elsewhere have had to deal with the possibility that a tick bite could mark the beginning of a bout with Lyme disease. Now the same ticks are spreading a new menace, and outdoorsmen need to begin the educational process again.
The “new” disease (it has been present in animals for centuries) is babesiosis. Like Lyme disease, it is transmitted by Ixodes ticks, was first described in New England, and has now spread through the Midwest and beyond. Although just a curiosity when I finished my medical training, babesiosis is now more common than Lyme disease in some parts of the country and has become a leading cause of infection from blood transfusions.
Despite its many similarities to Lyme disease, babesiosis is caused not by a bacterium but by a tiny parasite related to the one that causes malaria. This distinction is important, because both the diagnosis (direct microscopic examination of a blood smear) and treatment (anti-parasitic agents and not ordinary antibiotics) are totally different.
While many who contract the parasite never feel sick, others develop an acute illness characterized by fever, chills, and joint pain several weeks after the tick bite. In rare cases, the disease can be fatal if untreated. This is a special risk for hunters with impaired immune systems or those who have had their spleen removed.
One reason you need to know about babesiosis now is that many doctors still don’t. Hunters who develop a high fever after a tick bite in a high-risk area (go to cdc.gov/parasites/babesiosisfor current information and geographic distribution) should specifically mention the possibility of babesiosis to the treating physician to ensure that the right test is done.
The only way to prevent the disease is to prevent the tick bite. Hunters afield during the risky April–October period should wear long-sleeved shirts and tuck pant legs inside socks. Apply a DEET-containing repellant to exposed skin and spray permethrin on clothing. Check carefully for ticks after every outing, and remove any you find as soon as possible.

Proposed Lyme Bill in Virginia Would Inform Patients that Lyme Tests are Inaccurate

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVL0_OvT6LE


THIS IS GREAT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!







Proposed Lyme Bill in Virginia Would Inform Patients that Lyme Tests are Inaccurate


Did you hear whoops of excitement from Virginia this week?
A history-making bill (SB971) that would require doctors to inform patients of the inaccuracy of lyme testing is under consideration right now in my great state. I would have traveled to Richmond to support the bill in person, if I weren’t so ill with lyme myself.
Above is a video from YouTube of the January 29 debate in the state Senate earlier this week. If you are aren’t a hearing junkie, scan for the opposition’s argument, and fast-forward to these sections for compelling highlights:
[15:15] Senator Richard H. Black, who introduced this bill.  When asked if consideration has been made as to how the bill will intrude on patient/physician relationships (many doctors oppose the bill), Senator Black replies respectfully, “I have tremendous faith in our physicians and I believe in their ability to do their jobs. I feel like in this partiicular area [lyme disease] that this is a measure that would be of assistance and I think that it is something we owe to the people in the vast areas of  Virginia that are afflicted by this.”
The Senator then cites incidence charts [21:15] and says that while his district is ground zero for lyme in Virgnina, other areas also have a very high incidence.
[29:27] Senator Janet Howell.  “My constituents are suffering from a plague we have in my district, in Reston where there are whole families who are afflicted by this.”
She offers terrific commentary on the complexity of this disease and the challenges of prevention.
She hears us. And she understands that diagnosis and treatment must be timely to stave off the nightmare of full-blown lyme.
[31.58] Senator Thomas A. Garrett, Jr. ”I am loathe to tell doctors how to do their jobs, but there’s a problem…people are getting sick, and people are dying.”
Listen to the story of his nephew’s experience at four years old: Despite his rash and other symptoms, doctors told his family that we don’t have lyme disease in Virginia.
[34.21] Senator Jill Vogel “Loudoun, Fairfax, Fauquier, and Loudoun [counties] have been ravaged by lyme, and if you do not have it in your community, you cannot imagine the impact it can have.”
“I would support anything we could do — Public Service Announcements, education in schools — some effort where people could be at a mininum put on notice, because many many poeple have been treated for chronic fatigue syndrome, they’ve been treated for many many other things —  when they were actually dying from complications from lyme disease.”
She’s lived it; she and her son as well as their family dogs have been infected. She says that in her community, every single household has lyme disease.
I know for certain this bill can help people. I’ve been battling lyme for three years now because my general practitioner did not understand that the tests are inaccurate.
I was one of the lucky ones who actually saw the tick bite, but despite ongiong symptoms, she stopped treating me when my test results came back negative.
Like so many others, I’ve lost my health and vitality to this preventable chronic disease because of a simple lack of information. And experienced many losses because of it. I’m just thankful I found a lyme literate doctor. Many others aren’t so fortunate.
Republicans and Democrats have come together to support this critical bill. This week, the Virginia Senate passed the Bill 29 to 11. Let’s hope it goes all the way.
The story isn’t done yet. The Medical Society of Virginia and many doctors opposed to this bill. For the latest information, visit the National Capital Lyme Association. And if you’re from Virginia, write your Delegate today.

Yolanda Foster : Lyme disease can be can be fatal."

"(I) had all these words floating my brain and couldn’t make a sentence from it,' she said on Monday's show.
'That was the day I realised I was really sick and I needed help. I’m starting to see the light, and my brain is coming back.'
The newest housewife is very lucky she did realise something was wrong as Lyme disease can be can be fatal."

click on link to watch videos


'I was really sick': Yolanda Foster on how she realised she had Lyme disease as she watched herself rowing on Real Housewives

Unable to think straight, form sentences or function properly, Yolanda Foster knew something was wrong.
But it was not until a colossal fight with her Real Housewives of Beverly Hills co-star, Taylor Armstrong, that she realised she needed medical help.
The stunning Dutch model - and wife of composer David Foster - told Housewives creator Andy Cohen that was the day that led to her to being diagnosed of chronic Lyme disease.
Scroll down for video...
Struggling: Yolanda Foster reveals on Watch What Happens Live she has been battling lyme disease
Struggling: Yolanda Foster reveals on Watch What Happens Live she has been battling lyme disease
The bacterial condition caused by ticks had robbed the 48-year-old of brain function and had been affecting the mother of three daughters and five step-daughters for almost two years, she revealed on Monday night's Watch What Happen's Live.
'I’ve had it for about a year-and-a-half, two years,' the model said.
However, it was only when she had the confrontation with Taylor - whom she branded a 'a**hole'.
Fight life saver: While filming Real Housewives Of Beverly Hills after a fight with Taylor Armstrong Yolanda realised she was sick
Fight life saver: While filming Real Housewives Of Beverly Hills after a fight with Taylor Armstrong Yolanda realised she was sick
Taking each day as it comes: 'I'm starting to see the light, and my brain is coming back,' the star told creator Andy Cohen on Monday
Taking each day as it comes: 'I'm starting to see the light, and my brain is coming back,' the star told creator Andy Cohen on Monday
'(I) had all these words floating my brain and couldn’t make a sentence from it,' she said on Monday's show.
'That was the day I realised I was really sick and I needed help. I’m starting to see the light, and my brain is coming back.'
The newest housewife is very lucky she did realise something was wrong as Lyme disease can be can be fatal.

VIDEO Yolanda Foster talks to Bravo about her health scare

Laughing again: The model is now in treatment and starting to feel better
Laughing again: The model is now in treatment and starting to feel better
On her Bravo blog, the beauty - who was previously married wealthy real estate developer Mohamed Hadid - said she is now undergoing treatment for the infection.
'I am on Day 54 of my treatment and I continue to see some bright spots in my days,' she wrote.
'Looking back, though, I can see myself struggling to keep it together and participate as each episode airs. 
There on TV: 'Looking back, though, I can see myself struggling to keep it together and participate as each episode airs'
There on TV: 'Looking back, though, I can see myself struggling to keep it together and participate as each episode airs'
'The Lyme disease had so severely affected my brain functioning that it was extremely hard for me to think, form sentences, and stay focused. 
'I was always trying to be so extremely healthy because it was the only way I could get through my days.'
Since starting on the show it is not just Taylor whom the statuesque blond has clashed with.
Clashes: Since staring on the show the 48-year-old, pictured here on an episode with her daughter, has had run ins with Taylor and Brandi Glanville
Clashes: Since staring on the show the 48-year-old, pictured here on an episode with her daughter, has had run ins with Taylor and Brandi Glanville
On Yolanda's debut on the show she was her targeted by Brandi Glanville, who rudely told her: 'Your ex-husband is Mohamed.
'You know everyone, you've slept with everyone, it's all good.'
Of course, Brandi has been accused of  similar things and is also no stranger to controversy, being the ex-wife of LeAnn Rimes' new husband Eddie Cibrian, whom have publicly aired their dirty laundry in recent months.
Musical pairing: Yolanda is married to Grammy Award winner David Foster, on Tuesday the couple were in New York at The Today Show
Musical pairing: Yolanda is married to Grammy Award winner David Foster, on Tuesday the couple were in New York at The Today Show


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2270256/Yolanda-Foster-reveals-realised-suffering-lyme-disease-thanks-Real-Housewives-Beverly-Hills.html#ixzz2JTD7HcL4
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heavy metal toxicity and Lyme disease

What exactly are "toxic" metals?

In lay terms, toxic metals are metals that are poisonous to the system. Typically these metals are 'heavy metals', but there are a rare few 'low metals' that have proven to be toxic as well. Toxic metals are either not essential minerals, or are essential minerals that accumulate to levels that are so abnormally high that they become toxic to the body system. Toxic metals interfere with the metabolic process, therefor causing, or worsening, illness. Mercury, lead, radioactive metals, and cadmium are among the list of heavy metals that pose a threat to our health. Once in the body, these metals bio-accumulate, meaning they are absorbed faster than they are lost. Heavy metal exposure takes place in every day scenarios such as receiving a vaccine containing mercury at the doctor's office, or having amalgam fillings or crowns placed on your teeth at the dentist's office. Carefully research what you are putting in your system before agreeing to any procedure, as conventional medicine doctors often fail to fully educate you on the risks before proceeding.

What is the link between heavy metal toxicity and Lyme disease?

Mercury is the leading heavy metal responsible for hindering a person's complete healing from Lyme disease. Borrelia Burgdorferi -which is thought to be the main cause of "Lyme arthritis", as well as the most prevalent strain of Lyme disease in the U.S.- and bacteria from co-infections are believed to be insulated with metals. The metals are released into the body when the bacteria dies off. A person with Lyme tends to have a more difficult time detoxing than a healthy person, allowing heavy metals more time to build up in their body.

Severely weakening the immune system, heavy metals act as a catalyst to disease, basically meaning they work to accelerate infection. So, heavy metals are basically double edged swords. Since they weaken the immune system, it is logical to consider that a person with heavy metal poisoning may contract a more severe form of Lyme disease than an individual without mercury poisoning. On the other hand, since Lyme disease weakens a person's ability to detox poisons from their bodies, it is logical to consider that a person with Lyme is more susceptible to heavy metal poisoning. http://www.examiner.com/article/lyme-disease-and-heavy-metal-toxicity


Lyme disease and heavy metal toxicity
www.examiner.com



What exactly are "toxic" metals? In lay terms, toxic metals are metals that are poisonous to the system. Typically these metals are 'heavy metals', but there are a rare few 'low metals' that have proven to be toxic as well. Toxic metals are either not essential minerals, or are essential minerals that accumulate to levels that are so abnormally high that they become toxic to the body system. Toxic metals interfere with the metabolic process, therefor causing, or worsening, illness. Mercury, lead, radioactive metals, and cadmium are among the list of heavy metals that pose a threat to our health. Once in the body, these metals bio-accumulate, meaning they are absorbed faster than they are lost. Heavy metal exposure takes place in every day scenarios such as receiving a vaccine containing mercury at the doctor's office, or having amalgam fillings or crowns placed on your teeth at the dentist's office. Carefully research what you are putting in your system before agreeing to any procedure, as conventional medicine doctors often fail to fully educate you on the risks before proceeding. What is the link between heavy metal toxicity and Lyme disease? Mercury is the leading heavy metal responsible for hindering a person's complete healing from Lyme disease. Borrelia Burgdorferi -which is thought to be the main cause of "Lyme arthritis", as well as the most prevalent strain of Lyme disease in the U.S.- and bacteria from co-infections are believed to be insulated with metals. The metals are released into the body when the bacteria dies off. A person with Lyme tends to have a more difficult time detoxing than a healthy person, allowing heavy metals more time to build up in their body. Severely weakening the immune system, heavy metals act as a catalyst to disease, basically meaning they work to accelerate infection. So, heavy metals are basically double edged swords. Since they weaken the immune system, it is logical to consider that a person with heavy metal poisoning may contract a more severe form of Lyme disease than an individual without mercury poisoning. On the other hand, since Lyme disease weakens a person's ability to detox poisons from their bodies, it is logical to consider that a person with Lyme is more susceptible to heavy metal poisoning. http://www.examiner.com/article/lyme-disease-and-heavy-metal-toxicity Lyme disease and heavy metal toxicity www.examiner.com

In Lyme disease, the bacteria is a "smart" bug which wants to maintain its life within the person

Victoria Bowmann, PhD says.....
"When the Lyme is being killed, it produces its own neurotoxin in defense. This subsequently clogs the blood, lymph, liver and colon which slows down the detoxification pathways. And as long as the patient is in treatment for Lyme, detoxification needs to be ongoing. When the body is overburdened with a toxic load, the patient might experience a Herxheimer (Herx) reaction. One of my patients explained her Herx reactions like a bad hangover. She had extreme fatigue, headaches, nausea, flu-like symptoms, and a tingling sensation throughout her body. She also noticed that her usual symptoms were made much worse. It is during these episodes, the detoxification process becomes even more important.

Since there are numerous methods for detoxification, one must select those which offer the most support. The two primary pathways of detoxification are: 1) the colon which removes solid wastes and 2) the kidneys and bladder which removes liquid wastes. These pathways have external elimination, those being feces and urine. The liver is also a primary detoxification organ for toxins, hormones, and protein and fat metabolism. The pathway for water-soluble toxins is through the urine. Hormones are excreted through bile in the GI tract. The lungs and skin are the secondary pathways. The lungs outgas toxins from the bloodstream and the skin acts as an excretion pathway by erupting with pimples, pustules, abscesses or oozing sores in the attempt to remove toxins from the body." 



http://www.publichealthalert.org/Articles/victoriabowmann/Cleansing%20Neurotoxin%20Overload.html